Katakana Consonants

カタカナ子音

Introduction Introduction
Japanese does not have letters that represent pure consonants as in Latin alphabet, but instead uses syllabaries, which combined a consonant followed by a vowel.

Each consonant sound (with the exception of /y/ and /w/) combines with each vowel sound for a total of five characters per consonant. Each character is pronounced an entire syllable.

Since Katakana is used to write foreign words, which often have sounds that don't fit the syllabary scheme, many common rules for substituting foreign sounds. For instance, for words that end in consonants, characters ending in a /u/ sounds are used, such with the words for "mouse" マウス (mausu) and "pineapple" パイナップル (painappuru).

In the case of the /l/ sound, which is absent in Japanese, the katanana with /r/ are used, such as in the words for lemon レモン (remon) and lion ライオン (raion).

Another common practice is to elongate the /a/ sound to produce the "~er" sound common in many English words, such as in the word for lobster ロブスター (robusutaa). This is done with a special character, , which effectively duplicates a vowel.
Letters 文字
Play
ka
Play
ki
Play
ku
Play
ke
Play
ko
Play
sa
Play
shi
Play
su
Play
se
Play
so
Play
ta
Play
chi
Play
tsu
Play
te
Play
to
Play
na
Play
ni
Play
nu
Play
ne
Play
no
Play
ha
Play
hi
Play
fu
Play
he
Play
ho
Play
ma
Play
mi
Play
mu
Play
me
Play
mo
Play
ya
Play
yu
Play
yo
Play
ra
Play
ri
Play
ru
Play
re
Play
ro
Play
wa
Play
n m
Have questions about this lesson?

Get a video answer from a Polly Ambassador, if your question is relevant and interesting.

Change language Français Español English Deutsch Português 日本語