Subject Pronouns

ضمير الفاعل

Introduction مُقَدِّمَة
Also called personal pronouns, Arabic subject pronouns tell you who is doing the action of a sentence.

In English, subject pronouns are words such as "you", "we" and "it".

Arabic, however, is slightly more complicated because it uses gender and duality. For example "you" can translate many different ways, depending on who you are talking to. In the case of talking to a singular male, it translates as انتَ (aanta), but for a singular female انتِ (aanti). If you're talking to two males, it becomes أنتُما and for two females هُما. And finally if you're talking to a group of three people or more with at least one male, "you" translates as انتم (aantom) and for a group of three or more females انتن (aamton).

The word "they" similarly translates with gender. هم (hom) is used for male and mixed groups, and هن (hin) for female groups.

While learning the subject pronouns is important, Arabic is considered a pro-drop language, and the subject of a sentence is generally implied by the verb forms. For instance ساعد غيرك، يساعدك translates as "you help another, he helps you", but the words for "you" and "he" never appear in the sentence but are implicit from the verb forms.
Singular First-person
Play انا
aanaa
I
Second-person
Play انتَ
aanta
you masculine
Play انتِ
aanti
you feminine
Third-person
Play هو
howa
he
Play هي
hiya
she
Dual First-person
Play نحن
naHn
we
Plural First-person
Play نحن
naHn
we
Second-person
Play انتم
aantom
you all masculine plural
Play انتن
aamton
you all feminine plural
Third-person
Play هم
hom
they masculine
Play هن
hin
they feminine
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